Summer 2013 Courses

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Registration & More • Events & Worship

See the Course Cost table on the Registration & More page for registration fees by credits.


ONLINE & LONG BEACH, CA

UCC History and Polity at General Synod 2013

Barriger, Carol & Hill, K. Ray & Barr, Cameron
Dates & Times:  May 27-June 30 online; July 1-10 Long Beach (5 wks+)
Registration: THIS COURSE HAS BEGUN.  REGISTRATION IS CLOSED. 
Credits: 3.0 academic credits / 4.0 CEUs (40 contact hours)
Special cost:
Academic Credit $2040* / $150 administrative fees + CEUs $720. Also separate registration for Synod is required.
Course Number:
Academic Credit HSST-8225 / CEUs HSST-0001
Description:  This is a course in the History, Faith, and Polity of the United Church of Christ. It is designed to satisfy academic requirements in UCC History and Theology for people preparing for authorized ministry in the UCC, and also to provide an introduction for ministers from other denominations seeking privilege of call or ministerial standing in the UCC. Interested lay people are welcome to audit the course. The course will have, in addition to the two week intensive session on the heels of Synod, four online sessions starting in May. Auditors using the course for privilege of call or for preparation for ordination, please note: you will need to complete all the assignments that those taking the course for credit do. The course will be held in Long Beach and students will have room and board locally. The class will meet at or near the Convention Center and attend selected Synod sessions.  Separate registration for Synod is required.

The ONLINE portion of this course meets asynchronously using Moodle. It has no required
meeting times. High-speed internet connection required. See http://moodle.gtu.edu/mod/resource/view.php?id=22717 for full technology requirements. 

Purchase textbooks here.

Click here for more information about UCC History and Polity at General Synod 2013.

Scripture

Biblical Hebrew I 

Kramish, Robert
Dates & Times:  July 1-19 (3 wks), 9:00am - 1:00pm
Credits: 3.0 academic credits / 4.0 CEUs (40 contact hours)
Cost: Academic Credit $2040*  / CEUs $720
Course Number: Academic Credit BS-1135 / CEUs BS-0001
Description:  This is the first half of a six-week intensive course in which students will work through an entire first-year Hebrew grammar book, preparing them to enter an Intermediate Hebrew class upon completion of the course. Students who plan to take the entire course should sign up for both Hebrew I and Hebrew II. By the end of the two-part course, students will have acquired a command of the basic principles of Hebrew phonology, morphology and syntax. Students will be able to translate the text of the Hebrew Bible with the aid of lexicons and other grammatical resources.

[note: this is NOT an online course]

Required texts: Garrett, DeRouchie: A Modern Grammar for Biblical Hebrew. B&H Academic, 2009.
Garrett, DeRouchie: A Modern Grammar for Biblical Hebrew Workbook. B&H Academic, 2009. Purchase here.

See also: Biblical Hebrew II

Saint Romero

Liberation Liturgies

Mitulski, Jim
Dates & Times:  July 8-12 (1 wk), 9:00am - 1:00pm
Credits: 1.5 academic credits / 2.0 CEUs (20 contact hours) 
Cost: Academic Credit $1020*  / CEUs $360
Course Number: Academic Credit LS-1001 / CEUs LS-0001
Description:  Revolution starts with liturgy! How can we craft worship that will transform us so that we can transform the world? Do we expect the world to look different as a result of what happens when we worship? In this course we will examine the intersection of two disciplines at the core of every pastor's calling: liberation theology and liturgics. How does our ritual life look when we engage Latin and Central American, Feminist, Mujerista, Womanist, African American, GLBT or Queer (to name a few) theologies in the light of the sacraments, rites, and life cycle ceremonies that our traditions offer?  Society must change and religion can serve to subvert as well as to confirm the status quo. We’ll explore the UCC Book of Worship, the Episcopal Book of Common Prayer, and the Disciples’ Chalice Worship as well as other hymnals. Course includes optional field trips, panels of practitioners, and participation in the creation of a new collection of worship resources. The class will offer services for other summer school participants.

Required texts: Alexander, Michelle: The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness. New Press, 2012.
Bieler, Andrea: The Eucharist: Bodies, Bread, & Resurrection. Fortress Press, 2007. Purchase here.

Acquire at least two of the following:
Book of Common Prayer. Church Hymnal Corp, 2001. AND Enriching Our Worship. Church Publishing, 1997. (Episcopal)
UCC Book of Worship. UCC, 1986.
Chalice Worship. Chalice Press, 1997. (Disciples of Christ)
United Methodist Book of Worship. UMPH, 1992. Purchase here.

Choose one of the following, or ask about a book not on this list:
Aponte, Edwin. Santo: Varieties of Latina/o Spirituality. Orbis, 2012.
Cone, James: A Black Theology of Liberation. Orbis, 2010.
Ruether, Rosemary: Women-Church. Wipf & Stock, 2001.
Cheng, Patrick: An Introduction to Queer Theology. Seabury Books, 2011.
Pui-Lan, Kwok: Post-colonial Imagination and Feminist Theology. Westminster John Knox, 2005.
Song, C.S.: Theology from the Womb of Asia. Wipf & Stock, 2005.
Soelle, Dorothee: Suffering. Fortress, 1984. Purchase here.

Eliade Book Cover: Myth of the Eternal Return

Myths, Gospels, and Human Lives

Liew, Tat-siong Benny
Dates & Times:  July 8-19 (2 wks), 1:30 - 5:30pm
Credits: 3.0 academic credits / 4.0 CEUs (40 contact hours)
Cost: Academic Credit $2040*  / CEUs $720
Course Number: Academic Credit NTRS-2360 / CEUs NTRS-0001
Description:  This intermediate-level course will attempt to evaluate the category of “myth” as a lens to read and think about the stories related to the gospel or “good news” about Jesus, and how those stories relate to human lives.  The majority of the course will seek to acquaint students with both the theories and specifics of myths.  We will look at the work of myth critics (Frazer, Eliade, Levi-Strauss, Burke, Ricoeur), several ancient Near Eastern myths and a couple from other cultures and geographical areas, Rudolf Bultmann’s demythologizing project, as well as Paul Tillich’s understanding of “broken myths.”  Then we will turn to look at the effects—both socio-political and individual—of myths.  Issues concerning the relationship of myth to ritual, of myth to history, and of myth to faith and life will also be raised.

Required texts: Mason, Herbert: Gilgamesh: A Verse Narrative. Mariner Books, 2003.
Delaney, Carol: Abraham on Trial. Princeton University, 2000.
Barthes, Roland: Mythologies. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1972. Purchase here.

Arts MontageONLINE

Critical Texts in Contemporary Christian Theology and the Arts (RAST)

Méndez Montoya, Angel
Dates & Times:  July 8-August 2 (4 wks)
Credits: 1.5 academic credits / 2.0 CEUs (20 contact hours) 
Cost: Academic Credit $1020*  / CEUs $360
Course Number: Academic Credit RAST-8402 / CEUs RAST-0002
Description:  It is difficult to discern on the current renewal of the mutual complementing of theology and the arts. Some scholars may argue that this renewal has to do with the so-called postmodern and the postsecular turn: a new attention to the realm of alterity, the excessive sublime, the symbolic, and the poietic, and its complex relationship with the religious experience. This new attention to theology and the arts may also be related to a deeper reflection upon the material and embodied life, which are the concrete immanent contexts for the epiphany of the invisible and the sacred. A current academic inquiry into performativity considers it of central importance for shaping and giving life to both the practice or habitus of the art of doing theology, and the potential theological scope of art-making. Regardless of these multiple viewpoints on the relationship between the arts and theology, a current fascination is evident for the complexity of the aesthetic phenomena that appear as thoughts, feelings and emotions, evoking an aesthetic experience, opening up a crossroads in which the aesthetic and the sacred blend their horizons, simultaneously nurturing and exceeding one another.  For Christian theology, the connection between arts and theology is rooted in the contemplation of the creativity of God that perpetually creates and delights in creation. God is the artist per excellence. And through God’s incarnation and the pouring out of the Holy Spirit, all creation is further embraced by divine creativity. Therefore, the language of the arts can also provide a means for expressing divine creativity within humanity, and human creativity within the divine.

The leading questions that guide this course ask how the relationship between the arts and theology is made possible and how it could manifest in multiple languages, media, and genres. In order to explore and discern these questions, the course is divided into three sections. The first section presents a general introduction that integrates different ways in which theology and the arts can be inter-related. The second section explores concrete artistic languages and art media, searching to provoke theological thinking, gesturing towards a realization that art has a potential to become a locus theologicus. The third and final section focuses on current theological discourses that voice the mutual enriching of theology and the arts. The main goal of this course is to provide critical tools for enkindling artistic and theological imagination.

This ONLINE course meets asynchronously using Moodle. It has no required
meeting times. High-speed internet connection required. See http://moodle.gtu.edu/mod/resource/view.php?id=22717 for full technology requirements.

Required texts: Michael Austin: Explorations in Art, Theology and Imagination. Equinox Publishing, 2005.
Richard Viladesau: Theology and the Arts: Encountering God Through Music, Art and Rethorics. Paulist, 2000.
David Ford (ed): The Modern Theologians: An Introduction to Christian Theology in the Twentieth Century. Blackwell, 1997.
Graham Ward (ed): The Blackwell Companion to Postmodern Theology. Blackwell Publishing, 2005.
Ángel F. Méndez Montoya: The Theology of Food: Eating and the Eucharist. Wiley-Blackwell, 2011.
Kimer L. La Mothe: Between Dancing and Writing: The Practice of Religious Studies. Fordham, 2004. Purchase here.
 

Saturday Workshop

Microphone

Unleashing the Within: Spoken Word Poetry as Creative Arts Ministry

Lindsay, Richard; Evans, Mahsea; Peach, Rob
Dates & Times:  Saturday, July 13 (1 day), 10:00am - 4:00pm
Credits:  0.5 CEUs (5 contact hours) / not offered for academic credit
Cost: FREE!  Donations welcome at the door.
Course Number: CEUs RA-0010
Description: Spoken word is a form of rhythmic poetry based in hip-hop culture that is one of the most dynamic and important literary expressions of the new century. Often practiced in “poetry slams” at coffee shops, bookstores, and bars across the country, the community of spoken word transcends boundaries of race, class, ethnicity, age, gender identity, and sexual orientation. This workshop will examine the tradition, history, and practice of spoken word poetry as a means of creative ministry. The workshop is particularly recommended for anyone who works with youth and young adults as a way of understanding the rhythm of the younger generation. Workshop participants will develop their own rhyming style and perform for each other in a safe, nonjudgmental environment. No previous writing, speaking, or performing experience is necessary. Jump in, grab the mic, and surprise yourself with the power of your own voice!

What is spoken word poetry?  Watch instructor Mahsea Evans perform an original piece at PSR's 2013 Commencement:



Offered in collaboration with Lehrhaus Judaica

Witness to the World of Jesus: the Life and Times of Flavius Josephus

Grist, Jehon

Dates & Times:  July 15-19 (1 wk), 1:30 - 5:30pm
Credits: 1.5 academic credits / 2.0 CEUs (20 contact hours)
Cost:
Academic Credit $1020*  / CEUs $360
Special Cost:
Discount for Lehrhaus Judaica affiliates.  Email summer[at]psr[dot]edu for details.
Course Number:
Academic Credit BSHS-1003 / CEUs BSHS-0003
Description:
  Flavius Josephus stands as a towering figure who reported the first century world of Roman and Jewish cataclysm with passion and some accuracy. He also stands as a traitor to his own people, a claim that leaves a bitter taste among some writers of Jewish history to this day. Josephus himself understood his own contradictions and worked hard to defend his legacy as well as that of the Jewish People. Our class will survey his major works and assess his achievement as an historian, including his comments about earliest Christianity. We will also explore his Antiquities of the Jews to appreciate his early commentary on the Hebrew Bible. Finally, we’ll use archaeological discoveries to rebuild the world he inhabited and test the accuracy of some of his claims. Where relevant, artifacts from PSR's Bade Museum Tell en Nasbeh collection will be introduced.

Required texts: Whiston, William: The Life and Works of Flavius Josephus. Available online at no charge.
Feldman, Louis H.: Studies in Josephus' Rewritten Bible. Society of Biblical Literature, 2005.
Mason, Steve: Josephus and the New Testament. Hendrickson Publisher, 2003. Purchase here.

hands reaching

Living with Dying

Ameling, Ann
Dates & Times:  July 22-26 (1 wk), 1:30 - 5:30pm
Credits: 1.5 academic credits / 2.0 CEUs (20 contact hours) 
Cost: Academic Credit $1020*  / CEUs $360
Course Number: Academic Credit PS-1615 / CEUs PS-0012
Description:  Death is inevitable. Pastoral caregivers, in a variety of settings, will encounter death and dying.  Advances in treatment and technology have transformed the trajectory of many terminal illnesses. A growing number of people with terminal illnesses are living longer than ever before, often transforming terminal illness into chronic illness. HIV/AIDS, cancer, COPD, end stage diabetes and renal failure may take years, if not decades, before a person dies.  Pastoral care may involve long relationships with the dying, relationships which include hospital visitations, support during outpatient treatments and collaboration with hospice caregivers and other members of the treatment team. Pastoral care for the dying involves the diagnosed individual, families and other loved ones. The purpose of this course is to develop pastoral caregivers’ culture and gender awareness, understanding and competencies in creating environments to relieve suffering for individuals and families in a wide variety of settings. The course is based on the premise that meaning and transcendence at the end of life are best achieved and understood through the interpersonal use of narrative techniques to facilitate communication.  This course is strongly recommended for pastoral caregivers who have not had personal and professional experiences with dying, as well as those seeking deeper understanding.

Required texts: Biro, David: The Language of Pain: Finding words, compassion, and relief. W.W. Norton, 2010. Purchase here.

Optional texts: Lynn, Joanne; Harrold, Joan: Handbook for Mortals: Guidance for people facing serious illness. 2nd edition. Oxford University, 2011. Purchase here.

Dialogue

Dialogue as a Spiritual Practice

Azevedo, Americ
Dates & Times:  July 22-26 (1 wk), 1:30 - 5:30pm
Credits: 1.5 academic credits / 2.0 CEUs (20 contact hours) 
Cost: Academic Credit $1020*  / CEUs $360
Course Number: Academic Credit SPFT-1002 / CEUs SPFT-0002
Description:  Meaningful dialogue is a spiritual practice incorporating aspects of meditation and prayer, e.g., focused attention, patience, ego surrender, and cultivation of loving kindness. Furthermore, dialogue is a key element of cultural and organizational renewal. We explore the practices of Socrates, David Bohm, Martin Buber, and others. Dialogue in this context is an open-ended, spontaneous process enhancing creativity, understanding, and problem solving. The course is a five half-day “mini-retreat,” where we engage in dialogue as our primary way of learning.

Optional texts: Bohm, David: On Dialogue. Routledge, 2004.
Buber, Martin: I and Thou. Scribner, 2000.
Isaacs, William: Dialogue and the Art of Thinking Together. Doubleday, 1999. Purchase here.

Offered in collaboration with the Disciples Seminary Foundation

DOC Logo

Disciples of Christ History and Polity

Berquist, Jon
Dates & Times: July 22-August 2 (2 wks), 1:30 - 5:30pm 
Credits: 3.0 academic credits / 4.0 CEUs (40 contact hours)
Cost: Academic Credit $2040* / CEUs $720
Course Number: Academic Credit HSST-2021 / CEUs HSST-0004
Description:  This class will survey the history of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) from its foundings two centuries ago to the contemporary manifestations of the church.  Emphasis will be placed on the context of American Christianity, the interaction of the church with the wider culture, and the establishment of the church within the western United States.  Although the class will provide a critical examination of the history, we will focus on the usefulness of Disciples history for understanding the denomination’s present and its resources for the future.  The course will explore the present functioning of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) in its congregational, regional, and general expressions.  We will also analyze the theological roots and developments of the Disciples tradition, and discuss directions of mission and ministry within the contemporary Christian Church (Disciples of Christ).

Required texts: Sandhya Jha: Room at the Table: Struggle for Unity and Equality in Disciples History. Chalice Press, 2009.
Ronald E. Osborn: The Faith We Affirm: Basic Beliefs of Disciples of Christ. Christian Board of Publication, 1979.
Mark G. Toulouse, Gary Holloway, and Douglas A. Foster: Renewing Christian Unity: A Concise History of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). ACU Press, 2011. Purchase here.

Optional texts: D. Duane Cummins: The Disciples: A Struggle for Reformation. Chalice Press, 2009.
Peter Goodwin Heltzel, ed: Chalice Introduction to Disciples Theology. Chalice Press, 2008.
Lester G. McAllister and William E. Tucker: Journey in Faith: A History of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). Christian Board of Publication, 1975. 
D. Newell Williams, Douglas A. Foster, and Paul M. Blowers, eds: The Stone Campbell Movement: A Global History. Chalice Press, 2013. Purchase here.

Scripture Biblical Hebrew II

Kramish, Robert
Dates & Times:  July 22-August 9 (3 wks), 9:00am - 1:00pm
Credits: 3.0 academic credits / 4.0 CEUs (40 contact hours)
Cost: Academic Credit $2040* / CEUs $720
Course Number: Academic Credit BS-1136 / CEUs BS-0002
Description:  This is the second half of a six-week intensive course in which students will work through an entire first-year Hebrew grammar book, preparing them to enter an Intermediate Hebrew class upon completion of the course. Students who plan to take the entire course should sign up for both Hebrew I and Hebrew II. By the end of the two-part course, students will have acquired a command of the basic principles of Hebrew phonology, morphology and syntax. Students will be able to translate the text of the Hebrew Bible with the aid of lexicons and other grammatical resources.

Required texts: Garrett, DeRouchie: A Modern Grammar for Biblical Hebrew. B&H Academic, 2009.
Garrett, DeRouchie: A Modern Grammar for Biblical Hebrew Workbook. B&H Academic, 2009.
Brown, Driver, Briggs: Brown-Driver-Briggs Hebrew and English Lexicon. Hendrickson, 2007.
American Bible Society: Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia. American Bible Society, 1997. Purchase here.

See also: Biblical Hebrew I

LibraryONLINE

The Art and Technique of Effective Academic Writing

Ritter-Conn, Elizabeth
Dates & Times:  July 22-August 9 (3 wks)
Credits: 1.5 academic credits / 2.0 CEUs (20 contact hours)
Cost: Academic Credit $1020*  / CEUs $360
Course Number: Academic Credit IDS-8100 / CEUs IDS-0001
Description:  This writing course is designed to orient students to the primary types of academic writing they will be asked to do during their years at PSR and the Graduate Theological Union (GTU), including reflection papers, research papers, critical essays and exegetical papers. The course is intended to help students learn or “dust off” the writing skills they will need to succeed academically while in seminary.

Through online lectures and discussions, extensive exercises, and brief homework assignments, participants will learn the art and technique of composing critical writing in a U.S. academic setting. Among other topics, this course will cover: developing a topic; identifying reliable resources; reading and note-taking; constructing a thesis; writing and revising the outline, body, introduction and conclusion of a paper; formatting footnotes and bibliography; and preparing an audience-oriented summary of a paper. Participants will also learn how to identify and use the online resources of the GTU library. Finally, the course will introduce PSR’s Plagiarism Policy and will offer students strategies for avoiding plagiarism. 

This ONLINE course meets asynchronously using Moodle. It has no required
meeting times. High-speed internet connection required. See http://moodle.gtu.edu/mod/resource/view.php?id=22717 for full technology requirements.

Required text: Turabian, Kate L.: A Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations: Chicago Style for Students and Researchers; 7th or 8th Ed. University of Chicago, 2007. Purchase here.

Samoa church

History of Christianity in the Pacific Region

Walker, Randi & Muasau, Tafa
Dates & Times:  July 22-Aug 9 (3 wks), 9:00am - 1:00pm
Credits: 3.0 academic credits / 4.0 CEUs (40 contact hours)
SPECIAL Cost: Academic Credit $2040*  / DISCOUNTED CEU PRICE $360
Course Number: Academic Credit HS-4557 / CEUs HS-0003
Description:  Anyone doing ministry in the Pacific Northwest, California, or Hawaii will have noticed that the usual historical narratives that have helped mainline, ecumenical, and progressive Christians define their identity do not seem as relevant in the Pacific world where so many do not share the cultural and historical experience from which they derive.  In this class we will take a different look at the history of Christianity in the Pacific world and work with students to build historical narratives that will inspire and undergird the work of strengthening and re-shaping Christian communities for the future.

Required texts: Matsuda, Matt: Pacific Worlds: A History of Seas, People, & Cultures. Cambridge, 2012.
Koschorke, Ludwig, & Delgado: A History of Christianity in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Eerdmans, 2007. Purchase here.

De La Torre Book Cover

You may take this course in full, or you make take either the Analysis or the Advocacy weeks as described below.

Biblical Ethics: Analysis & Advocacy (2 week course)

De La Torre, Miguel
Dates & Times:  July 22-August 2 (2 wks), 9:00am - 1:00pm
Credits: 3.0 academic credits / 4.0 CEUs (40 contact hours)
Cost: Academic Credit $2040* / CEUs $720
Course Number:
Academic Credit CEBS-4303 / CEUs CEBS-0003
Description:  Anyone who reads the Bible does so from a particular social location. We are all born into an on-going society that shapes us. When we turn our attention to the biblical text as the source of our ethical perspectives, we participate in a dialogue between the written word and the meanings our community taught us to give to these words. Many of us have been taught to read the Bible through the eyes of white, middle-class heterosexual males. Yet, can the text liberate those who are oppressed? To do so, it must be read with the eyes of the disenfranchised. This course will explore how the Bible can be used to bring about justice for those who suffer due to their disenfranchisement and dispossession.  The aim of this survey course is to enable students to accomplish the following goals: First, to read the Bible from the perspectives of those suffering from race, class and gender oppression.  Second, to investigate Biblical protest narratives as ethical praxis this can lead toward resistance and struggle against domination and oppression.  Third, introduce ethical reflections about contemporary moral issues in a global context drawing on ethical and social theory and analysis, and on theological and biblical perspectives.  Finally, to examine various liberationist Biblical interpretations as a source for overcoming dominant religious power structures.

Required texts: De La Torre, Miguel A. Reading the Bible from the Margins. Orbis, 2002.
Sugirtharajah, R.S. Voices from the Margins: Interpreting the Bible in the Third World. Orbis, 2006.
West, Traci C.: Disruptive Ethics: When Racism and Women's Lives Matter. WJK, 2006. Purchase here.

De La Torre Book Cover

This week-long course is drawn from a longer two-week course (see above).

Biblical Ethics: Critical Analysis (1 week course)

De La Torre, Miguel
Dates & Times:  July 22-26 (1 wk), 9:00am - 1:00pm
Credits: 1.5 academic credits / 2.0 CEUs (20 contact hours) 
Cost: Academic Credit $1020* / CEUs $360
Course Number:
Academic Credit CEBS-3302 / CEUs CEBS-0002
Description:
This week-long course is drawn from a longer two-week course (see above). Anyone who reads the Bible does so from a particular social location. We are all born into an on-going society that shapes us. When we turn our attention to the biblical text as the source of our ethical perspectives, we participate in a dialogue between the written word and the meanings our community taught us to give to these words. The aim of this survey course is to enable students to accomplish the following goals: First, introduce ethical reflections about contemporary moral issues in a global context drawing on ethical and social theory and analysis, and on theological and biblical perspectives.  And then, to examine various liberationist Biblical interpretations as a source for overcoming dominant religious power structures.

Required texts: Sugirtharajah, R.S. Voices from the Margins: Interpreting the Bible in the Third World. Orbis, 2006. Purchase here.

 

De La Torre Book Cover

This week-long course is drawn from a longer two-week course (see above). 

Biblical Ethics: Advocacy: Applying the Bible to Modern Ethical Dilemmas (1 week course)

De La Torre, Miguel
Dates & Times:  July 29-August 2 (1 wk), 9:00am - 1:00pm
Credits: 1.5 academic credits / 2.0 CEUs (20 contact hours) 
Cost: Academic Credit $1020* / CEUs $360
Course Number:
Academic Credit CEBS-3301 / CEUs CEBS-0001
Description: This week-long course is drawn from a longer two-week course (see above). Many of us have been taught to read the Bible through the eyes of white, middle-class heterosexual males. Yet, can the text liberate those who are oppressed? To do so, it must be read with the eyes of the disenfranchised. This course will explore how the Bible can be used to bring about justice for those who suffer due to their disenfranchisement and dispossession.  The aim of this survey course is to enable students to accomplish the following goals: First, to read the Bible from the perspectives of those suffering from race, class and gender oppression.  And then, to investigate Biblical protest narratives as ethical praxis that can lead toward resistance and struggle against domination and oppression. 

Required texts: De La Torre, Miguel A.: Reading the Bible from the Margins. Orbis, 2002.
West, Traci C., Disruptive Ethics: When Racism and Women’s Lives Matter. WJK, 2006. Purchase here.

Hopkins Book

Being Human: Race, Culture, and Religion

Hopkins, Dwight
Dates & Times  July 29-August 9 (2 wks), 1:30 - 5:30pm
Credits:
3.0 academic credits / 4.0 CEUs (40 contact hours)
Cost: Academic Credit $2040*  / CEUs $720
Course Number: Academic Credit STRS-2568 / CEUs STRS-0002
Description:  This course, “Being Human”, will explore the question: What does it mean to be human from a Christian perspective? We will cover the key issues and what is at stake. We will also bring into the question other disciplines and examine the meaning of a Christian theological anthropology for today.

The class welcomes all who are interested in this key question. Whatever your personal views, beliefs, or thoughts, to “be human” is a central concern for individual cultivation and communal well-being. The class is open to a diversity of positions. Come join us in the conversation. We invite you to develop your own theological voice – your traditions, experiences, and hopes for the local community and for the world.

Required texts: Marc Cortez: Theological Anthropology. Bloomsbury T&T Clark, 2010.
Dwight N. Hopkins: Shoes That Fit Our Feet. Orbis Books, 1993.
Andrew Sung Park: The Wounded Heart of God. Abingdon Press, 1993. Purchase here.

Offered in collaboration with the Center for Progressive RenewalCPR logo

reNEW: Skills for Leading New and Renewing Progressive Churches

Piazza, Michael
Dates & Times:  July 29-August 2 (1 wk), 1:30 - 5:30pm  
Credits: 1.5 academic credits / 2.0 CEUs (20 contact hours) 
Special Cost: Academic Credit $1020*  / CEUs $549 - register w/ CPR
Course Number: Academic Credit FT-2517 / CEUs FT-0001
Description:  This course teaches practical skills for starting a new progressive church or leading the renewal of a church that is stagnant or in decline.  It is designed around the premise that churches are rarely resurrected, but can be born again, hence the skills needed in both situations are very similar: creating compelling vision, an effective communication strategy, data management, community development, external mission, transformational worship, etc.  This class is designed and taught by the co-directors of the Center for Progressive Renewal.

Special Registration ProcessRegister for Academic Credit | Register for CEUs w/ CPR (CPR scholarships available)

Required texts: Dresher, Elizabeth: Tweet If You Love Jesus. Morehouse, 2008.
Leas, Speed: Discovering Your Conflict Management Style. Alban Institute, 1998.
Piazza, Mike & Trimble, Cameron: Liberating Hope: Daring to Renew the Mainline Church. Pilgrim, 2011.
Tickle, Phyllis: The Great Emergence. Baker, 2008. Purchase here.

 

No Shame

Shame-less Lives, Grace-full Congregations

McClintock, Karen
Dates & Times: August 5-9 (1 wk), 1:30 - 5:30pm 
Credits: 1.5 academic credits / 2.0 CEUs (20 contact hours) 
Cost: Academic Credit $1020*  / CEUs $360
Course Number: Academic Credit PSFT-2001 / CEUs PSFT-0001
Description:  You’ve heard someone say, “Shame on you!” at some point in your early years, or a parent told you, “You should be ashamed of yourself.”   Yet shame is rarely motivational.  These messages combined with theological teachings on perfection, discipleship, and the salvation of “depraved” sinners, all add to our confusion and soul hunger for something with a bit more grace.  Shame is not a useful method of teaching moral behavior or inspiring growth, though it continues to operate in diverse theological systems and congregations.

This class with address the difference between shame and guilt and provide ways to eliminate shame while improving personal and congregational health.  Shame’s debilitating residue leaves us disconnected within ourselves, and disconnected to others.  Most of us don’t even know when we are shaming ourselves or leading from a place of shame.  In this class we will address several types of personal and congregational shame including: comparison shame, trauma shame, sexual shame, chronic illness shame, and the shame-blame game.  Participants will learn to replace shame with grace in their inner self-talk and in their interpersonal relationships.

Required texts: McClintock, Karen: Shame-Less Lives, Grace-Full Congregations. Alban, 2012. Purchase here.

Optional texts: McClintock, Karen: Sexual Shame: An Urgent Call to Healing. Fortress Press, 2001.
Brown, Brene: The Gifts of Imperfection. Hazelden, 2011.
Robert H. Albers Ph.D.: Shame: A Faith Perspective. Haworth Pastoral, 1995.
Potter-Efron, Ronald & Patricia: Letting Go of Shame. Hazelden, 1989. Purchase here.

Schneider bookCreative Writing Workshop

Schneider, Pat
Dates & Times: August 5-9 (1 wk), 9:00am - 1:00pm
Credits: 1.5 academic credits / 2.0 CEUs (20 contact hours) 
Special Cost: Academic Credit $1020 / CEUs $1020
Course Number: Academic Credit RA-3700 / CEUs RA-0001
Description: The purpose of this workshop is twofold: (1) to enable the artist in each person to become more free and more able to write, (2) to model a methodology for using writing to create a healing community. There are no required readings or papers for this workshop. Limited to 12 students.

There will also be a showing of the internationally award-winning film, Tell Me Something I Can't Forget, followed by a discussion of using writing to empower the silenced. Open to the public. The showing will be on Wednesday, August 7 at 7pm in Mudd 103.

All seats in the Creative Writing Workshop are filled. 

Wait List: This is a very popular course and it has limited seats.  Those who complete the wait list will be contacted in order if seats open up. This wait list does not guarantee placement in the course.  Wait List Form

All seats in the Creative Writing Workshop are filled.

Required texts: Schneider, Pat: Writing Alone and With Others. Oxford, 2003. Purchase here.

Optional texts: Gardner, John: On Becoming a Novelist. WW. Norton & Company, 1999.
Burroway, Janet: Writing Fiction. Longman, 2010.
Kooser, Ted: The Poetry Home Repair Manual. Bison, 2007.
Finch, Annie: A Formal Feeling Comes. Wordtech, 2007.
Lamott, Anne: Bird by Bird. Anchor, 1995.
hooks, bell: Remembered Rapture. Holt, 1999.
Williams, Miller: Patterns of Poetry: An Encyclopedia of Forms. Louisiana STate, 1986.  Purchase here.