Summer Session 2013 - Special Events and Worship


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Events & Worship

Tuesday Night Talks

LecturePSR is excited to welcome the general public to our campus each summer for a series of lectures and conversations given by distinguished members of the faculty and special guests.

The 2013 "Talks" were held on Tuesday nights during Summer Session. Every year, Tuesday Night Talks are offered to the public free of charge and include a pre-talk reception at which all are welcome. Facilities are looped for the hearing impaired.



  

2013 Talk Archives

Coming soon:  Video of the 2013 Tuesday Night Talks
Watch this page for links!

July 2: Victoria Kolakowski

The Courtroom as Praxis: Reflections of a Seminary Educated Judge

Victoria Kolakowski photo

Judge Victoria Kolakowski reflects upon her experiences as a superior court judge in California and how her education at PSR has supported and informed her in performing her judicial duties.

Victoria Kolakowski earned master’s degrees in biomedical engineering, electrical engineering, public administration and divinity. She received a law degree from Louisiana State University. In 1990, Kolakowski moved to Berkeley, California. She served on the Oakland Budget Advisory Committee and was an administrative law judge for the California Public Utilities Commission. In 1994, the East Bay Lesbian/Gay Democratic Club named her Woman of the Year. In 1995, she received the Outstanding Woman of Berkeley Award. Kolakowski is the first openly transgender person to be elected a trial judge in the United States. In 2010, she campaigned for a judgeship on the Superior Court of Alameda County, California. She won by 10,000 votes. Her victory was significant, not only for the transgender community, but also for women, who occupy a small percentage of judgeships. She received Equality California’s Equality and Justice Award.


July 9: Jim Mitulski

This Is My Body... These Are Our Bodies: Eucharist as a Revolutionary Act

Jim Mitulski photo

The first phrase ("This Is My Body") is the foundation for the Eucharist, the central act of Christian Worship.  What does worship, community Christianity look like when the second phrase ("These Are Our Bodies") is reverenced with the same fervor as the first?  All bodies are sacred - the female body, the male body, bodies of all colors and classes, transgender bodies, HIV-negative and HIV positive bodies, the migrant body and the settled body - to name just a few examples of bodies of sacred worth. Come celebrate the Body in this talk about Eucharist as a Revolutionary Act.

Rev. Jim Mitulski is PSR's co-director of worship and a campus pastor, as well as being pastor of New Spirit Community Church (www.newspiritchurch.org) which meets in the PSR chapel. Jim has been a pastor for 27 years, serving churches in New York City, Los Angeles and San Francisco, as well as being a Merrill Fellow at the Harvard Divinity School. He was pastor of the Metropolitan Community Church in San Francisco during the AIDS years from 1985-2000 and performed many weddings, in addition to many funerals. He holds a BA from Columbia University, an M.Div. from PSR, and an honorary doctorate in sacred theology from Starr King School for the Ministry.


July 23: Miguel De La Torre

 What Would Jesus Eat?  Confessions of a Christian Vegan

Miguel De La Torre photo

Much have been written on eating healthy; but few examine how our Western American diet is causing hunger and oppression in the Global South.  This public lecture will concentrate on the global consequences of a meat-based diet - specifically to the world's bio-diversity, environment, land usage, and water rights.    

The Rev. Dr. Miguel A. De La Torre, Professor of Social Ethics and Latino/a Studies at the Iliff School of Theology in Denver, Colorado was elected President of the Society of Christian Ethics in 2012. Dr. De La Torre has been an expert commentator concerning ethical issues (mainly Hispanic religiosity, LGBT civil rights, and immigration rights) on several local, national, and international media outlets. A scholar-activist, Dr. De La Torre has written numerous articles in popular media. He writes a monthly column for Ethics Daily that continuously creates controversies for his unique approach of religiously analyzing social issues from the perspective of the dispossessed and disenfranchised.


July 30: Tafa Muasau

The Establishment of Methodism in the Samoan Islands & Ancient Ties between Samoa and Tonga

Tafa Muasau photoIn this lecture the presenter attempts to establish that there were ties between the two island groups: that inter land voyaging was possible in the ancient past and the ties between the two Island groups contributed towards the arrival, the acceptance and the establishment of Methodism in the Samoan Islands.

Rev. Muasau is president of Kanana Fou Theological Seminary in American Samoa.  He is an important figure in theological education in Oceania and has been active in the Ecumenical Association of Third World Theologians (EATWOT) Pacific branch for many years.  He is also a strong supporter of women’s leadership in the church.  Rev. Muasau holds a BD and MTh from Pacific Theological College.

 

August 6: Dwight Hopkins

Mapping Being Human: Black, USA, and China

Dwight Hopkins photoThis lecture draws on three sources to discern what are the possible characteristics to faciliate healthy being human today. Looking at African American folk tales, foundational western notions, and traditional Chinese perspectives, we will map the fluid components of healthy community and healthy individuality in contemporary and global realities.

Dwight Hopkins is Director of MA Studies and Professor of Theology at the University of Chicago Divinity School. He has authored Being Human: race, culture, and religion and Shoes That Fit Our Feet: sources for a constructive black theology. After graduating from public schools in Richmond, VA, Hopkins attended the 8th to the 12th grades at Groton School (an Episcopalian, all-boys boarding school); Harvard University (BA); Union Theological Seminary, New York (M.Div., M.Phil, Ph.D.); and University of Cape Town, South Africa (Ph.D.) He is ordained in the American Baptist denomination.

Listen to 2012 Tuesday Night Talks:
Peter Schneck
Hubert Locke
John Shelby Spong
Bob Johansen
Vivian Chavez
Devin Zuber
John Shelby Spong, David Hollinger, & Byron Williams

Listen to 2011 Tuesday Night Talks:
Mary Hunt
Debra Haffner
Yvette Flunder
Angel Mendez-Montoya
Rosemary Radford Ruether


PSR South Bay Summer Lecture Series at FCC San Jose

July 18, August 8, & August 22 at First Congregational Church of San Jose.
Talks from 7:30-9:00pm with a reception to be held afterwards (all welcome).

First Congregational Church of San Jose
1980 Hamilton Avenue
San Jose, California

We are excited to begin offering summer programming for the general public in the South Bay.  Join us for a short series of lectures and conversations given by distinguished members of PSR's Summer Session faculty and special guests.

The talks will be held on Thursday nights at 7:30pm during Summer Session. They are
free of charge, and open to the public, with receptions following the talks.


July 18: Jim Mitulski

This Is My Body... These Are Our Bodies: Eucharist as a Revolutionary Act

Jim Mitulski photo

The first phrase ("This Is My Body") is the foundation for the Eucharist, the central act of Christian Worship.  What does worship, community Christianity look like when the second phrase ("These Are Our Bodies") is reverenced with the same fervor as the first?  All bodies are sacred - the female body, the male body, bodies of all colors and classes, transgender bodies, HIV-negative and HIV positive bodies, the migrant body and the settled body - to name just a few examples of bodies of sacred worth. Come celebrate the Body in this talk about Eucharist as a Revolutionary Act.

Rev. Jim Mitulski is PSR's co-director of worship and a campus pastor, as well as being pastor of New Spirit Community Church (www.newspiritchurch.org) which meets in the PSR chapel.  Jim has been a pastor for 27 years, serving churches in New York City, Los Angeles and San Francisco, as well as being a Merrill Fellow at the Harvard Divinity School. He was pastor of the Metropolitan Community Church in San Francisco during the AIDS years from 1985-2000 and performed many weddings, in addition to many funerals.  He holds a BA from Columbia University, an M.Div. from PSR, an honorary doctorate in sacred theology from Starr King School for the Ministry.

August 8: Karen McClintock

Living Shamelessly: Grace-full Alternatives

Karen McClintock photo

Karen A. McClintock, M.Div, Ph.D is a psychologist specializing in shame recovery. She teaches in the psychology department at Southern Oregon University. She is a national lecturer and workshop leader on shame and grace, healthy relationships, and sexual abuse prevention. Her books on shame recovery include a new book Shame-Less Lives, Grace-full Congregations, and her previous book Sexual Shame: An Urgent Call to Healing (Fortress Press).  She is an ordained United Methodist clergyperson with a passion for religious diversity and sexual diversity. Her passion is to rid people of debilitating shame, much of which is taught in religious ideologies and institutions. More information is available at: www.healthycongregation.com

August 22: Ann Jefferson

Singing the Dream: Spirituals & Gospel Music in the Civil Rights Movement

Ann Jefferson photo
Rev. Ann Jefferson, a 33-year resident of the Bay Area, currently works as Program Coordinator of the Theological Education for Leadership (TEL) Program at Pacific School of Religion and Summer Music Program Coordinator at First Congregational Church of Berkeley. Ann also serves as Associate Pastor of Worship & Liturgy at City of Refuge UCC in San Francisco and has served as a musician and music director of several congregations throughout the Bay area. She brings 30+ years’ experience to her study and teaching of the history of African-American sacred music. She has taught numerous seminars in this subject area including: collaborative workshops with Linda Tillery (founder and artistic director of the Cultural Heritage Choir), several PSR courses, and a seminar on African-American women hymn and gospel pioneers at the 2010 annual conference of the Hymn Society of the United States and Canada.

Additionally, she was a key planner of the African-American hymn festival for the Society’s conference held in Berkeley in 2008. In August 2010, she received a Heritage Keepers’ Award from the Friends of the Negro Spirituals.  Rev. Jefferson enjoys working with circles of learning and leadership to inspire hearts toward greater reflection, worship, and transformative action. She is also passionate about preaching and creating sacred liturgies and liturgical items customized for a variety of congregational, family, and community settings. This year Ann realized one of her creative goals by producing a concert of original compositions and arrangements through her own venture, Rhythms of Grace Creations.


Badè Art Exhibit: Site/Structure featuring David Sleeth

Badè Museum, June 6 - August 23
Opening reception: Doug Adams Gallery, June 6, 2013, 5pm -7pm
Free and open to the public

bade photo Each year at PSR, an artist is invited by the Doug Adams Gallery to create a body of work inspired by the Badè Museum of Biblical Archeology, and its collection of objects spanning a period of 3,000 years. The artist-in-residence gains access to the entire Badè collection, and, in consultation with museum staff, conducts research that informs their final exhibition. The Mining The Collection series fosters cross-disciplinary dialogue and brings to life significant Iron Age, Babylonian and Persian Period artifacts, placing them in a new contemporary context.

David Sleeth's Site/Structure opens with an unframed collage depicting stonewalls surrounding Tell en-Nasbeh, a site northwest of Jerusalem that was excavated by William Frederic Badè between 1926 and 1935. With a focus on experimental archeology and an interest in sculptural work, David Sleeth uses lithics (tools), iron implements, ceramics and other small artifacts, as well as original photographs of Tell en-Nasbeh, for a related series of pen and ink drawings. He also includes a sculptural piece made of wood, carved through the traditional process of burning and scraping, adding a dimension to this compelling study of material, fabrication and object.



Art Lab: Maker Mondays

Maker mondays graphic

Open Studio: Mondays. 6-9pm, June 17th through July 29th
Location: D'Autremont Hall, Pacific School of Religion, 1798 Scenic Ave., Berkeley

This summer, Center for The Arts Religion & Education (CARE) is sponsoring an on-campus studio experience designed to foster community around the creating process. Art Lab launches this summer with series of workshops and studio sessions led by practicing visual artists, including David Sleeth, whose exihibition Site/Structure will be on view this summer in the Doug Adams Gallery.



Film Showing: Tell Me Something I Can't Forget

Wednesday, August 7, Mudd Hall 103, 7:00-9:00pm

tell me graphicOn Wednesday evening, August 7, there will be a showing of the internationally award-winning film, Tell Me Something I Can't Forget, followed by a discussion of using writing to empower the silenced.
The film features the Chicopee Writers' Workshop in Massachusetts, a project designed to give economically disadvantaged women the opportunity to confront their difficulties and develop their talents through creative writing. Using verite footage, interviews and narrative sequences, this moving film reflects the diversity of the group and the direct, honest format of the workshop. Taking its structure from the writers' work -- poetry, narrative pieces, short works of fiction and journal entries -- Tell Me Something I Can't Forget examines the role of creativity in everyone's life. Directed by Diane Garey and Lawrence Hott.

Saturday WorkshopMicrophone

Unleashing the Within: Spoken Word Poetry as Creative Arts Ministry
Lindsay, Richard; Evans, Mahsea; Peach, Rob
Dates & Times: Saturday, July 13 (1 day), 10:00am - 4:00pm
Credits: 0.5 CEUs (5 contact hours)
Cost: NEW - OFFERED FOR FREE!
Donations welcome at the door.

Description: Spoken word is a form of rhythmic poetry based in hip-hop culture that is one of the most dynamic and important literary expressions of the new century. Often practiced in “poetry slams” at coffee shops, bookstores, and bars across the country, the community of spoken word transcends boundaries of race, class, ethnicity, age, gender identity, and sexual orientation. This workshop will examine the tradition, history, and practice of spoken word poetry as a means of creative ministry. The workshop is particularly recommended for anyone who works with youth and young adults as a way of understanding the rhythm of the younger generation. Workshop participants will develop their own rhyming style and perform for each other in a safe, nonjudgmental environment. No previous writing, speaking, or performing experience is necessary. Jump in, grab the mic, and surprise yourself with the power of your own voice!

What is spoken word poetry? Watch instructor Mahsea Evans perform an original piece at PSR's 2013 Commencement: